Blast Standards

Blast protection must be a consideration in design when a facility is a potential target or when a building is located in the vicinity of a potential target. The blast from an explosion does not discriminate and will expand radially from its point of origin until it encounters a solid structure, a wall with windows and doors for example. The blast then causes a pressure to be applied to the windows and doors. The amount of pressure and the time (duration) that the pressure is applied results in a measurable amount of energy that is imparted to the window and/or door. A portion of this energy is absorbed by the window and/or door through the flexing of the glazing material. The remainder of the energy is transferred to the framing system and anchors. Minimal rotation of the frame is allowed to ensure the glazing is retained and the anchors must withstand the shear force imparted by the frame. At U.S. Bullet Proofing, a complete computer analysis is performed by seasoned professionals for each blast application. This analysis includes specifying the bolts which are provided as part of the system package to ensure the required blast protection is achieved. See the following document for an explanation of blast specifications and glazing performance criteria:

GSA Glazing Performance

Ballistic Standards

Protection from a ballistic threat first involves identifying what size weapon from which protection is required.  This threat can range from small caliber handguns to much higher caliber rifles.  As in blast applications, energy must be absorbed.  In the case of ballistics, projectiles with higher caliber and higher velocity result in a larger amount of energy being imparted onto a door, window or wall system.  As the projectile impacts the glazing, the energy is absorbed by layers of glass and/or a layer of polycarbonate.  It is important to note that any ballistic glazing certified to meet a ballistic standard, must be retained in a framing system that has also been certified.  The framing system must be capable of stopping the potential threat and retain the glazing system during attack.

The two most common ballistic standards are Underwriters Laboratory 752 (UL 752) and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ).  UL 752 is most widely used in the commercial sector, while NIJ is predominantly used by the federal government but can be specified for any application.  When specifying ballistic protection, please utilize one of the rating levels from the tables below.

UL 752 RRatings of Bullet Resistant Materials

RRatings Ammunition Grains Weight Velocity Number of Shots

MIN/MAX (FPS)

(MPS)

LEVEL 1 9mm Full Metal Copper Jacket with Lead Core 124 8.0 1175 1293 358 3
LEVEL 2 .357 Magnum Jacketed Lead Soft Point 158 10.2 1250 1375 385 3
LEVEL 3 .44 Magnum Lead Semi-Wadcutter Gas Checked 240 15.6 1350 1485 411 3
LEVEL 4 .30 Caliber Rifle Lead Core Soft Point (.30-06 caliber) 180 11.7 2540 2794 774 1
LEVEL 5 7.62mm rifle Lead Core Full Metal Copper Jacket, Military Ball (.308 caliber) 150 9.7 2750 3025 838 1
LEVEL 6 9mm Full Metal Copper Jacket with Lead Core 124 8.0 1400 1540 427 5
LEVEL 7 5.56mm Rifle Full Metal Copper Jacket with Lead Core (.223 caliber) 55 3.56 3080 3388 939 5
LEVEL 8 7.62mm Rifle Lead Core Full Metal Copper Jacket, Military Ball (.308 caliber) 150 9.7 2750 3025 838 5

 

 

NIJ Standard 0801.01 Ballistic Resistant Protective Materials

Armor Type

Test Ammunition

Nominal Bullet Mass

Suggested Barrel Length

Required Bullet Velocity

Required Hits Per Armor Specimen

Permitted Penetrations

 I

 22 LRHV

LEAD

38 Special

RN Lead

 2.6g

40gr

10.2g

158gr

15 to 16.5 cm

6 to 6.5 in

15 to 16.5 cm

6 to 6.5 in

 320 12 m/s

1050 40 ft/s

259 15 m/s

850 50 ft/s

5

 

5

0

 

0

 

 II-A

 357 Magnum

JSP

9 mm

FMJ

 10.2g

158gr

8.0g

124gr

10 to 12 cm

4 to 4.75 in

10 to 12 cm

4 to 4.75 in

 381 15 m/s

1250 50 ft/s

332 12 m/s

1090 40 ft/s

5

 

5

0

 

 II

 357 Magnum

JSP

9 mm

FMJ

10.2g

158gr

8.0g

124gr

15 to 16.5 cm

6 to 6.5 in

10 to 12 cm

4 to 4.75 in

 425 15 m/s

1395 50 ft/s

358 12 m/s

1175 40 ft/s

5

 

5

0

 

0

III-A

 44 Magnum

Lead SWC Gas

Checked

 

9 mm

FMJ

 15.55g

240gr

 

 

 

8.0g

124gr

14 to 16 cm

5.5 to 6.25 in

 

 

 

24 to 26 cm

9.5 to 10.25 in

 426 15 m/s

1400 50 ft/s

 

 

 

426 15 m/s
1400 50 ft/s

5

 

 

 

 

5

0

 

 

 

 

0

 III

 7.62 mm

308 Winchester

FMJ

 9.7g

150gr

56 cm

22 in

 838 15 m/s

2750 50 ft/s

5

0

 IV

 30-06

AP

 10.8g

166gr

56 cm

22 in

 868 15 m/s

2850 50 ft/s

1

0

AP - Armor Piercing

FMJ - Full Metal Jacket

JSP - Jacketed Soft Point

LRHV - Long Rifle High Velocity

RN - Round Nose

SWC - Semi-Wadcutter 

 

Forced Entry Standards

Forced entry is the attempted penetration of a door or window using a wide variety of tools. These tools may include, but are not limited to sledge hammers, five-foot pry bars, wood splitting mauls, fire axes, battering rams, gasoline, acetone, propane torches and CO 2 fire extinguishers. The number of people, the tools used, and the duration of the attack vary among the standards used to measure forced entry resistance. One of the most stringent standards is used by the State Department for overseas embassies and diplomatic facilities. U.S. Bullet Proofing is proud to be one of only a few companies in the world certified by the State Department to build forced entry products to this standard. Other standards include ASTM F1233 and H.P White Laboratory Test Procedure 0500.03 for glazing material, ASTM F588 for windows, and ASTM F476 for doors. These standards have multiple levels of rRatings based on the severity of the threat.

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

Ratings of Bullet Resistant Materials, Maryland

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

 

Send mail to webmaster@usbulletproofing.com with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright 2005 United States Bullet Proofing, Inc.